What is Cataract?

A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window.Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend’s face.

Cataract
Most cataracts develop slowly and don’t disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision. At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure.

We will help you decide, when cataract surgery is right for you. Delaying the procedure won’t make it more likely that you won’t recover your vision if you later decide to have cataract surgery. Take time to consider the benefits and risks of cataract surgery. If you choose not to undergo cataract surgery now, we may recommend periodic follow-up exams to see if your cataracts are progressing.

Cataract surgery involves removing the clouded lens and replacing it with a clear artificial lens. The artificial lens, called an intraocular lens, is positioned in the same place as your natural lens, and it remains a permanent part of your eye. Cataract surgery is generally done on an outpatient basis, which means you won’t need to stay in a hospital after the surgery. Our patients usually spend approximately two hours at the hospital (from admission to discharge) for a surgical procedure that last 6-15 minutes.

During cataract surgery, we use anesthetic drops to numb the area around your eye. Cataract surgery is generally safe, but it carries a risk of infection and bleeding. Cataract surgery increases the risk of retinal detachment. After the procedure, you’ll have some discomfort for a few days.

 

Consult us for more advice and how we can help you

Need more advice and help?